Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

2007

Adventure / Family

Synopsis


Uploaded By: YIFY
Downloaded 271,502 times
August 2, 2011 at 10:08 pm

Director

Cast

Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter
Emma Watson as Hermione Granger
Rupert Grint as Ron Weasley
Brendan Gleeson as Alastor 'Mad-­Eye' Moody
720p 1080p
550.00 MB
1280*528
English
PG-13
English
23.976 fps
2hr 18 min
P/S 48 / 167
1.85 GB
1920*796
English
PG-13
English
23.976 fps
2hr 18 min
P/S 134 / 395

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by inzirilloc 10 / 10

Simply Put...Phenomenal (A Book-Reader's Review)

OK. Yes stuff was left out. Yes some things were inaccurate. And yes, at times the story jumped around. But I'll tell you what, if that's the price to pay for being able to see fantastic literature on the big-screen...I'll take a few inconsistencies any day.

For having the task of taking 870 masterful pages and turning them into a 2.5 hour movie, David Yates did one heck of a job. This movie is a must-see, no matter how you look at it. For book-readers, sure you notice the absence of certain parts, but you finally get to see what you've imagined in your head for years take place in real-live motion on the screen…and you know what, those few things left out, help you gain a better understanding anyway, because you have already read the in-between stuff. Then, in the same breath, this is a great movie for non-book-readers as well. For those HP fans who take the lighter approach of skipping the books and simply following along by the movies…you won't know what you're missing anyway. The biggest complaints about this movie will be from book-readers who wanted a 10-hour long, word-for-word re-creation of the book. Other than that, there is nothing to complain about. Acting was great, story-line was great, and the special effects were flawless.

(Slight Spoiler In This Paragraph) Being a book-reader, I knew heading in that I would have to be prepared to accept substantial cuts from all that takes place in the book. However, the parts that Yates chose to focus on, were by far, the most important ones; and the way in which he did it, left me speechless. Yates was clearly at his best at the movie's climactic ending. When reading those last few chapters, when Harry is at the Ministry, and there is the great battle, the book reads like a whirlwind. Everything is happening at once: death-eaters here, death-eaters there, Sirius finally getting the chance to fight, Moody kicking ass, Ginny going on a tear and straight-up owning people. And you try to picture in your head what all this would look like…a million things going on at once, and trying to picture how wizards and witches really "fight" each other. Somehow, someway, Yates was able to create that fast-paced, action-packed, confusion, and then all of a sudden, like an orchestra going flat after their last booming note, Sirius Black is gone…just like in the book. This was the hardest part for me to swallow when reading the book, as tears ran down my cheeks, not only because Sirius was my favorite character, but because you go from such a "high" of seeing the Order save the day, to the unbelievable "low" of seeing Harry's godfather simply fade away. This is an emotion and thought process which was excellently portrayed in the film. Ironically enough, Yates was only warming up.

As for the Dumbledore/Voldemort showdown, I don't think that it could have been done better. In a Star Wars type fashion, Harry is being tempted by Voldemort to release his anger, to have his revenge on Bellatrix Lestrange, to have a taste of the dark side. And as we sit there fearing for confused, helpless Harry, we see a green fire of hope, and more like Master Yoda than any other fictional character, Albus Dumbledore appears and engages Voldemort in a wizard-duel that puts Gandalf and Sarumon to shame.

The way the movie engaged the audience and got their emotion kicking is a great film-making talent not found in many movies anymore. Think of the way Yates made you HATE Umbridge, just like the book. The way you felt bad for Snape when you saw his hidden past, just like the book. And think of the best two lines of the movie where you felt comfort, confidence, and safety on Harry's part. The first of these lines was Sirius Black to Lucius Malfoy: when the death-eaters are over-whelming the kids, Sirius appears behind Lucius with a firm, "get away from my godson." Then once again, when Harry is alone with Voldemort, Dumbledore appears and almost as if to initiate the duel, says, "It was a mistake for you to come here tonight, Tom." Overall, the movie was fantastic. The best of the five…by far. You just have to put aside the gaping holes of chapters that were left out, and look at what was done well. For the book-readers, imagine if you were forced to take only 400 of the 870 pages out of the book…you would take the most important ones that relate to the plot. So as much as the "prefect storyline" and the "Harry/Cho drama" and all that other stuff is a great read, the big screen simply doesn't allow enough time for it. As for the non-book-readers…pick up the books and get busy. Because as great as a job that Yates did with the movie…the woman he got the story from, Ms. Rowling, might just be one of the greatest authors of our time.

Now go spend 10 bucks and enjoy the show!

Reviewed by whoisdamascus 2 / 10

Riddikulus

I feel cheated. I really do. Too much omitted this time.

WARNING: DON'T READ ANY FURTHER IF YOU HAVEN'T SEEN THE MOVIE or READ THE BOOK.

Firstly, Harry stabbed the dementor in the eye with his wand! What?! Secondly, did anyone find Kingsley Shacklebolt's hat mildly unnecessary? Just asking. Then, there's the complete omission of Hermoine's and Ron's elevation to prefect, AND of Harry becoming captain of the Quidditch team. In fact, there was no Quidditch at all. Frowny faces abound. They skipped the visit to St. Mungo's, and it would've been funny to see Gilderoy Lockhart again. It also seemed like the Weasley brothers' grand exit was stolen from them. The fireworks were cool, but there was none of the flair, there was no speech, and there was (yet again) no Peeves. Sad times. And then, despite all these omissions, they find time to have a scene of everyone from the DA in detention writing lines with blood-ink quills, which never even happens in the book. Booo. However, through all this, there was one glimmer of hope: The fight in the Ministry. "The battle at the Ministry will make it all better," I said to myself. Not so! I mean, sure, it was good looking, but the entire Hall of Prophecy collapsing? Surely the shelves in that kind of room are sturdier than that. The distinct lack of almost ALL of the Department of Mysteries? Where was the brain room? Where was the hummingbird in the hourglass? And most importantly, where was the prophecy?! We get a snippet of it, but it comes out before the thing even breaks. And now we come to the saddest part: Sirius's death. (I told you, you shouldn't be reading if you haven't seen/read it already.) It was definitely as sad as it should've been, but it wasn't nearly as abrupt as it was in the book. It's shocking because of its suddenness. It becomes more real that way; it shocks the reader as much as it does Harry. It just didn't seem jarring enough. Also, the young wizards were casting nonverbally, which will (presumably) create confusion when Harry duels Snape in Half-Blood Prince. Oh, and the Priori Incantatum thing with Voldemort and Dumbledore? What?

I will say that Umbridge and Bellatrix Lestrange were perfect for their roles, and the thestrals were very cool. The acting was all extremely well done, the content just left a lot to be desired.

But what do I know? It's hard to write movies. I just wish the film has included more of the important, meaningful content.

Reviewed by karolyn_with_a_k 5 / 10

Slow Down!

I love the Harry Potter books, and I've always liked the movies. That's why I was very excited to go see the latest installment of the series. However the movie did not at all live up to my expectations; to me it felt rushed and choppy. I realize that Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix was a very long book, but so was The Goblet of Fire and I enjoyed it's movie adaptation a lot. In this movie seemed as though the director merely had a check list of scenes that he needed to but in the movie put no thought into connecting them. The speed and choppiness of the movie took away from the characters. It was just events and there was hardly any character development at all. Which was a shame because the young cast continues to get better, and there were some amazing acting veterans (Gary Oldman, Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham Carter etc.) In my opinion if the director had slowed everything down, only a little, he could've added a lot more (character development, humor, fluidity) However, despite by prier comments, the movie was not terrible. It did have it's good moments, but I think it could have been done a lot better.

Read more IMDb reviews

114 Comments

Be the first to leave a comment