Moonraker

1979

Action / Adventure

Synopsis


Uploaded By: Gaz
Downloaded 52,780 times
December 11, 2012 at 2:35 pm

Director

Cast

Roger Moore as James Bond
Lois Chiles as Holly Goodhead
Michael Lonsdale as Hugo Drax
Richard Kiel as Jaws
720p 1080p
950.38 MB
1280*544
English
PG
English
23.976 fps
2hr 6 min
P/S 6 / 20
1.79 GB
1920*816
English
PG
English
23.976 fps
2hr 6 min
P/S 12 / 45

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Righty-Sock (robertfrangie@hotmail.com) 8 / 10

Experience the sheer magnificence of Q's final line!

When a Moonraker space shuttle, on loan from the United States to England, is hijacked, Bond is called in to investigate...

Bond surely possess the latest knowledge about nuclear power and is able to fly a rocket ship... Bond's girls too have moved with the times and now join battle alongside him, fighting off the enemy with equal proficiency...

It's nice to see Bond dressed as a Brazilian gaucho, galloping up to a 16th-century Benedictine monastery, and safecracking in a magnificent French chateau...

Roger Moore is seen humorous and light hearted, gliding through St. Mark's Square in his motorized gondola... He fights with a Chinese manservant in the Venice Glass Museum with great style, and stops himself from throwing a priceless bowl valued at £1 million... He takes out one speedboat with some mines, another with a torpedo and takes off on a hang-glider as his boat goes over the falls...

Bond was initially surprised that a top rocket scientist at Drax Industries was an attractive young woman… He set aside his aggressive attitudes when he realized that not only was Holly a fully trained astronaut on loan from NASA—she was also a CIA agent… She liked better working alone and he had to exhaust himself to win her over…

The eleventh Bond film seems to recycle a number of elements familiar from earlier adventures, most obviously Stromberg's hired killer, Jaws, played once again by Richard Kiel... Hugo Drax, the vengeful ex-Nazi of Fleming's novel, is reinvented as a psychotic who is obsessed with the conquest of space, and plans to wipe out the globe's population with a powerful type of nerve gas... His plan for mass murder completed, Drax will then repopulate the planet with his own master race… His fleet of shuttles—the Moonrakers—which are based in South America, will transport his master race into space… There they will live on a radar-invisible space station until Earth's depopulation has been completed…

Drax likes to play a little Chopin on his grand black piano, and enjoys a cucumber sandwich... His vanity leads him to control his ferocious hounds by the click of his fingers… He brings from France every block of stone used on his California residence... According to his charming pilot, "What he doesn't own, he doesn't want!" and, like Auric Goldfinger, affects a desire to play English country sports...

Michael Lonsdale's performance is astonishingly controlled and precise as Hugo Drax... There's something really scary about his true personality and character... He gives sarcastic remarks about 007: 'You appear with the tedious inevitability of an unloved season.' 'At least I shall have the pleasure of putting you out of my misery!' 'Mr. Bond, you persist in defying my efforts to provide an amusing death for you.'

Jaws returns in "Moonraker" and adds some tension to the film… Richard Kiel has become something of a cult figure since his appearance in 'The Spy Who Loved Me'. He reappears as indestructible as ever... He impersonates Christopher Lee in Dracula mode, and has an entirely different trip down a mountain... His little scenes with a cute little blonde girl are very sweet... His despairing search for her on the disintegrating space station is wonderful... The bitter little smile he and Bond share as they prepare for their set-to atop the cable car is inspired...

Corinne Dufour (Corinne Clery) becomes one of Bond's early bedmates… Corinne is Hugo Drax's beautiful helicopter pilot and executive assistant… Unfortunately, in Drax's eyes, her amorous byplay with Bond also marks her for early elimination...

Sadly, 'Moonraker' would mark the end of Bernard Lee's 45-year film career... Already visibly frail, Lee would succumb to stomach cancer; he died in London's Royal Free Hospital on 16 January 1981... Although he made a notable contribution to such outstanding mystery dramas as Carol Reed's 'The Third Man,' and Basil Dearden's 'The Blue Lamp,' it is for his definitive 'M' that he will be remembered...

Reviewed by john-597 (john@e1600.demon.co.uk) 10 / 10

A brilliant Bond film that is highly underrated!


"Moonraker" is the most unfairly criticised of all the Bond films. The 11th film in the series and the fourth starring Roger Moore, "Moonraker" works very well for a number of reasons. As Ian Fleming's original novel (written in 1955) had become too dated to translate to the screen, the producers decided to capitalise on the sci-fi craze started by Star Wars, and so created a spectacular space-age adventure where Bond himself journeys into outer space.

Whilst this film was certainly inspired by Star Wars, this is not meant to imply that "Moonraker" copies directly from the former. Don't forget that only the last 20-30 minutes of the film takes place in space. Although the laser battle looks dated by modern standards, it is still a classic slice of Bond action, that, as one reviewer has stated, compares with the underwater battle in "Thunderball". And on that level it works superbly.

What I especially like about "Moonraker" is the way it glides smoothly from one action sequence to another. This way, there's not only no shortage of thrills, but an overall level of consistency in the storyline is maintained, where Bond hops across the globe (to Venice and Rio, for example) uncovering clues as to the disappearance of the Moonraker space shuttle. On the way, he survives the customary assassination attempts by the bad guys (Drax and Jaws), and then at the end of the film all the clues piece together to complete the jigsaw. It's steady, consistent storylines like this that prove the key to a successful Bond film.

Purists often accuse "Moonraker" of being too stupid. Although there are some pretty outrageous sight gags, the film still retains its enormous appeal. Certainly, "Moonraker" is the most light-hearted Bond film, and it's quite clear that Roger Moore was enjoying himself tremendously here. His performance in this escapade certainly brought a smile to my lips.

There's also a wonderful cast. Drax is quite possibly the best Bond villain. His one-liners are great and he is certainly not short of ideas on how to dispose of Bond. The beautiful Lois Chiles proves to have the right qualities as an astronaut/CIA agent, and she is a worthy ally to 007. Bond's first romantic encounter Corinne Dufour (Corinne Clery) brings a lot to the film. Richard Kiel makes his encore performance as the steel-toothed giant Jaws. After his superhuman appearance in "The Spy Who Loved Me", Jaws plays more for laughs this time round, but his Roadrunner/Wile E. Coyote-type battles with 007 are still entertaining. There's also another henchman, Chang (Toshiro Suga) who provides more credibility if somewhat less invincibility in a superbly staged duel with Bond in a glass factory.

"Moonraker" also sees John Barry at his composing best. He provides a number of rich, atmospheric tracks that perfectly reflect the film's outer space theme. Shirley Bassey's third title song isn't quite as good as "Goldfinger" but better than "Diamonds Are Forever", and is certainly as good as Carly Simon's song for TSWLM.

"Moonraker" has often been placed at the bottom of the Bond spectrum. It doesn't belong there. It has everything a successful Bond film needs: a great plot, superb villains, exotic locations, beautiful women, brilliant special effects (for which visual effects maestro Derek meddings received an Oscar nomination) and action by the bucketful. There are scenes which generate genuine suspense and which feature awe-inspiring stunts in mid-air and on water. The space scenes are well done and all aspects of the space shuttle look true to life. In summary, "Moonraker" is a brilliant film in its own right and should rank up there with "Goldfinger" and "The Spy Who Loved Me" as one of the best Bonds ever made. I strongly urge you doubters to take a second look.

Reviewed by ShadeGrenade 10 / 10

"Take care of Mr.Bond. See that some harm comes to him!"

Roger Moore's first two 007 films - 'Live & Let Die' and 'The Man With The Golden Gun' - clambered aboard whatever cinematic bandwagons were rolling at the time, such as blaxploitation and martial arts. By the end of the '70's, sci-fi was back in vogue thanks to 'Star Wars', hence 'Moonraker' replaced 'For Your Eyes Only' as the next Bond movie.

Until 'Die Another Day' in 2002, it was universally regarded as the nadir of the series. I disagree. One has to remember that around this time Kevin McClory was threatening a 'Thunderball' remake starring Sean Connery, and thus Cubby Broccoli could not afford to takes risk with the formula.

The film bears little resemblance to Fleming's book, which concerned a nuclear rocket attack on London. As 'The Spy Who Loved Me' had proved popular with audiences, it was decided to give them more of the same, hence Christopher Wood's script had the villain hijacking space shuttles instead of submarines, and Richard Kiel's 'Jaws' returned to menace Bond. Lewis Gilbert once more supervised the mayhem.

Bearded French actor Michael Lonsdale made an excellent 'Hugo Drax'. Like 'Stromberg', he is wealthy, and plans to create a new civilisation by destroying the old one. Ken Adam once again delivers some marvellous sets, such as the Pyramid control centre and Drax's Space City.

The action scenes were even wilder that those of 'Spy', including a magnificent free-fall pre-credits scene, Bond's gondola turning into a hovercraft, Jaws and Bond getting to grips on a cable car over Rio, a speedboat chase in South America, and a shoot-em-up finale in outer space. John Barry produced another fabulous score, particularly 'Flight Into Space'.

As a strapping young lad growing up in '70's Britain, I always made a point of seeing the latest Bond, usually with my friends in tow. We did not care if the films were faithful to Fleming, if there was too much humour, or if Moore was wooden, we went to have a good time and did.

No offence to Connery, but for us Moore was The Man. Suave, sophisticated and debonair. On leaving the theatre we would attempt to recreate Bond's fights, usually resulting in one of us being cautioned by the police.

And the gadgets! 'Moonraker' outdid them all. I once tried to build Bond's wrist-dart gun. I don't think anybody walked out of a Timothy Dalton Bond feeling like they could conquer the world, but with Roger's we did. And we saw them more than once in theatres.

I do wish that some of the gags had wound up on the cutting room floor, namely 'Jaws' flapping his arms after his parachute breaks, Alfie Bass' cameo as a drunken Italian, and a pigeon doing a double-take as Bond's gondola roars by. Take these out and you have a pretty decent Bond movie.

Sadly, 'Moonraker' marked the final appearance of Bernard Lee as 'M'.

Read more IMDb reviews

39 Comments

Be the first to leave a comment