Quarantine

2008

Horror / Sci-Fi

44
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 58%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 44%
IMDb Rating 6.0

Synopsis


Uploaded By: Bokutox
Downloaded 29,108 times
July 9, 2012 at 12:52 am

Cast

Jennifer Carpenter as Angela Vidal
Steve Harris as Scott Percival
Columbus Short as Danny Wilensky
720p 1080p
701.40 MB
1280*688
English
R
English
23.976 fps
1hr 29 min
P/S 7 / 12
1.35 GB
1920*1040
English
R
English
23.976 fps
1hr 29 min
P/S 9 / 17

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Simon_Says_Movies 7 / 10

Infectious Horror

Even at a glance, it is clear that Quarantine has boarded the 'fad' bandwagon it two respects. Firstly, this chiller joins up with the abundance of remakes that choke the gullet of Hollywood, and at an impressively rapid pace I may add, duplicating its Spanish predecessor (Rec) within a year's time. Secondly, it is the successor in a line of films, some from earlier this year in fact, that adopt the hand-held camera technique (which may soon be classified more accurately as a gimmick) to construct a first hand, real time account of events. Yet, despite succumbing to these popular fixations, and the flag of death that is the studios reluctance to screen the film, Quarantine is crisp effective horror.

When comparing (Rec) and Quarantine, the similarities are glaring. In fact, the films are almost identical, save a few altered snippets. Which is good in the sense that nothing was lost in translation and although nowhere near as disgraceful as remaking classics or art films, it still begs to ask the question why? Alas, the average viewer does not wish to read subtitles, especially when watching horror, so the update went through. Directed by newcomer John Erick Dowdle he makes the most of his debut. Procuring a larger budget then its inspiration, Quarantine looks better as a whole (despite more frequent incomprehensible shots involving darkness and jiggle cam) and is able to incorporate some effects into the production, such as a continuous and chilling shot of a person being tossed down a stairwell. Comparisons to 2008's earlier films Cloverfield and Diary of the Dead are unavoidable, and remains squarely in the middle; a far-cry from the ingenuity and atmosphere of Cloverfield, but avoids the horrendous acting and scripting of Diary.

Mirroring (Rec) Quarantine begins with a reporter, Angela Vidal (Jennifer Carpenter) who hosts a late night television program. On this particular night, Angela and her cameraman Scott (Steve Harris) are doing a ride-along with the firemen of a local station in L.A., including Jake (Jay Hernandez) and Fletcher (Jonathan Schaech). After a tenuous night of boredom and anxiety, they are finally called to the scene of an apparent accident in an aging condo, involving an elderly tenant. Things are not as they seem however as soon after, the CDC seals off the building with the foursome, and the reaming residents still inside. Their reasoning is good it seems, as all hell breaks loose as a mysterious rabies virus rips through the building turning those exposed into zombie-like fiends. The survivors must work together to battle the infected, the authorities and each other.

Both films incorporate the inherent problem of the disease itself, which seems to frequently shift in its required incubation period, but is not really a huge impediment for the film as a whole. The opening act which is situated entirely at the station is both surprisingly involving and witty, and works to some extent as character development. The finale is also pulse-pounding, if not entirely inspired, but lacks the sheer terror I felt at the finale of (Rec). When breaking it down, Quarantine's opening is better then the original, and (Rec)'s final act is better then its imitator, so things balance out. Each film boast a superb scene mid to late film, including the aforementioned stairwell plummet in Quarantine and a scene in (Rec]) involving the same stairwell in which the heroes peer down to see the lower floors of infected peering back; eerie stuff. I would encourage horror fans to see both before making their choice, and to be honest I haven't quite chosen myself which is superior. Regardless, Quarantine takes advantage of a ploy that has not yet become stale, and yielding authentic portrayals from its relatively unknown cast and an ominous atmosphere, this flick is infectious to be sure.

See all my reviews at: http://simonsaysmovies.blogspot.com

Reviewed by A_Roode 7 / 10

Not quite as strong as the original, but still very good.

There must have been comedians in the projection booth the night that some friends and I went to see a family friendly film. These particular friends tend to watch only light-hearted material and get upset for weeks whenever they see horror films or intense thrillers. They were totally unprepared for a 'Quarantine' trailer and it shocked them all so badly that we nearly had to leave and get our money back. Maybe it was because of their strong reaction that my interest in the film has stayed so high for the past several months.

This week I have seen both 'Quarantine' and 'Rec' the film that 'Quarantine' is a remake of. 'Rec' is not without flaws but it is a very solid and chilling horror film. 'Quarantine' is able to expand on several of the strengths in 'Rec' while falling into a few pitfalls of it's own. Both films are about a TV news crew taping a show about what a night in the life of a fireman is like. A seemingly routine call turns out to be something much more and the news crew is trapped in a quickly quarantined building.

Giving credit where it is due, 'Quarantine' kept me on the edge of my seat for most of the movie. It lures you in with a very relaxed opening ten minutes but once you reach the building and the cop in charge asks why the camera crew is there, the whole tone of the movie changes. The fun and games, the light-hearted banter is gone. We only realize how serious it is though when they enter the apartment of an injured old woman. For me the tension starts with the entrance to the apartment and never lets up. Each new segment that the TV crew starts filming holds potential terror. The set design and the lighting are terrific and 'Quarantine' walks a careful tightrope of character action. So often in horror films the audience is yelling with frustration at what characters on the screen are doing because it all goes against common sense. There is a little bit of that early on but 'Quarantine' does a better job of playing to the characters and their panic. Characters die not through naivety or stupidity as much as they do from inevitability and inescapability. The key performance comes from Jennifer Carpenter.

The film's greatest strength and weakness at the same time, Carpenter is the focus of the camera because of her role as the reporter and it isn't an easy part to play. She is solid for the majority of the film but terror essentially overwhelms her with ten minutes to go and she is reduced to a sobbing, shrieking, shivering bowl of jello. Would I or anyone else be any better in the situation that 'Quarantine' creates? Hard for me to say but probably not. The problem is that there were three primary acting choices for her to make in the final ten minutes: she could play it as a hysteric (which she does), she could play it as numbing down her fear like the cameraman does in order to try and escape, or she could have been so overwhelmed by her fear that she becomes a functional catatonic working on autopilot. Carpenter's choice is probably the 'truest' choice for how people would react. That doesn't mean that it is going to make for good drama. Her transformation from confident and outgoing to hysterical jabbering is so jarring that it feels forced instead of real. The camera man keeps telling her to calm down when they've reached a potentially safe room but she is far beyond the calming down stage and well into the years of therapy one instead. I found it to be just too much and actually pulled me out of the horror and towards comedy instead.

'Rec' felt a bit more organic and gritty than 'Quarantine.' The performances are decent in both but you feel less of a connection to the characters in 'Quarantine.' Many are clearly there to serve as fodder with no attempt to seriously develop them. 'Rec' does a much better job, particularly when the reporter interviews each of the buildings residents. The five minutes spent in filming those sequences gave more of a stake to the audience into the well-being of those characters. That never really takes off in 'Quarantine' and I regret that they didn't follow the lead of 'Rec'. One thing that I thought 'Quarantine' did a much better job of was in plot clarity and how they provided information. The clues to the source of what is going on are much more explicit and come very early in the movie. 'Rec' dropped a few hints for the viewer to put together but relies on the final five minutes to give the major clues about patient zero. What patient zero is spreading is clearer in the remake and I thought the clarity benefited the plot. Of course by the time you find out about patient zero, Carpenter's character is beyond being able to help provide the audience with anymore real analytical power. Don't blink or you'll miss everything you need to know.

I give the slight edge to 'Rec', but certainly recommend 'Quarantine' to horror fans. It's problems aren't severe enough to detract from a very decent effort.

Reviewed by slasherguyy 7 / 10

Solid Remake, but the original "Rec" was far superior...

Quarantine is a remake of 2007 Spanish horror film Rec, which has been receiving amazing reviews from horror fans, including myself. It was tense, terrifying and had great acting. I only saw Rec a few months ago, and would say it's one of the best of the year. Hearing about a US remake so soon, especially one told to be shot-for-shot, was kind of ridiculous. However, the cast for Quarantine was good, the trailer and stills looked cool, so I thought I'd give it a watch to see how it holds up to Rec. Needless to say, Rec was better, but I still enjoyed Quarantine. It was better than the remakes of Shutter, The Eye and One Missed Call, that's for sure.

Plot basically tells the story about a young woman who is filming with her cameraman at a fire station in Los Angeles, when they receive a distress call from an apartment. They head out, soon make a horrifying discovery regarding one of the residents and find themselves Quarantined by the government in the apartment building. It's exactly the same plot as the original, but it isn't actually shot-for-shot as there are a few new scenes thrown in there. Good ones, though. The acting was also strong, with Jennifer Carpenter being the lead. Manuela Velaso was better in Rec, but Jennifer did a really good job. I was surprised at the lack of Johnathon Schaech's screen time though, considering he was in nearly every scene in the recent remake of Prom Night. I loved Dania Ramirez and Jay Hernandez too.

Quarantine has really good acting, is entertaining from start to the end, but it has it's flaws. The movie was actually a little slow in one or two parts, and some of the characters I didn't really care for, such as the cocky businessman. I am also rather annoyed by the lack of effort from the writer/directors of this film. Drew and John Dowdle are rather new to the business, and not only have they remade a film that is less than a year old, but the direction and writing just wasn't there. They took most of the screenplay from Rec, so if anyone deserves the writing credit, the original makers deserve most of it. The direction, well, was also lacking...because it's a POV movie and a lot of shots are similar to the original, so the guy clearly didn't do as much as a regular director because it's a POV remake. They have also lied to the audiences, saying that they changed the ending. So they are new to the business, remaking a film less than a year old and lying? Stupid. I feel that the actors, and the creators of the original Rec, made this film what it was. The only things the Dowdle brothers deserve credit for are for their new scenes (5-10 mins total, which probably took an hour or two to write) and well, assisting with some of the direction...oh, and also managing to collect huge paychecks for doing very little of what a normal writer/director would do.

Overall, Quarantine was an entertaining remake after some of the lame ones we've had this year. It's nowhere near as bad as the haters are thinking it is, which actually doesn't make much sense, because if they loved the original...why hate a shot-for-shot remake? Unless it's because it has American actors, which again wouldn't make sense, as they are very talented actors. If you dislike POV movies though, this movie won't really be for you, so don't be an idiot and go and see it, and then complain about feeling sick...it's your own fault! Rec was the superior film, but overall, Quarantine was a good remake. But like I said before, if anyone deserves the credit for this remake, it's the original writer/directors (for the shots, writing and original - this remake wouldn't be here without them) and the actors of this remake. I do advise you though, don't be ignorant over a movie with subtitles, and check out the original Rec. It really is an amazing film.

Quarantine (2008) - 7/10.

Rec (2007) - 9/10.

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