Red Riding: In the Year of Our Lord 1974

2009

Crime / Drama

Synopsis


Uploaded By: Gaz
Downloaded 25,776 times
August 29, 2012 at 12:03 am

Director

Cast

Andrew Garfield as Eddie Dunford
David Morrissey as Maurice Jobson
John Henshaw as Bill Hadley
Anthony Flanagan as Barry Gannon
720p 1080p
850.75 MB
1280*688
English
Not Rated
English
23.976 fps
1hr 42 min
P/S 5 / 4
1.60 GB
1920*1040
English
Not Rated
English
23.976 fps
1hr 42 min
P/S 5 / 7

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Simon_Says_Movies 6 / 10

Everyone has demons...

Don't let the 1974 fool you, this year merely indicates the time period in which this British crime drama is set. The first film of a trilogy, 1974 sets up the desolate Yorkshire town which has again been struck with the grizzly and brutal murder of a young girl. This makes her merely an entry in string of disappearances over the previous decade. Despite atmosphere thick enough to ski upon, this movie fails to offer much compelling and is a tough slog not only due to its grimy nature but also its convoluted narrative.

What begin with an investigation into a young girls disappearance, gives way to a murder, then to police corruption and bureaucratic cover-ups. Dropped squarely in the center is amateur journalist Eddie Dunford (Andre Garfield) whose combination of determination and coyness take him down a dark road. I will not even delve into the plot more than I have, as not only is it too complex to adequately lay out, but I am still trying to sort it all out myself.

While the performances are uniformly good, the characters are thoroughly unlikeable. Even our protagonist Eddie has a smarmy quality to him that makes it difficult for a real connection to be achieved. This is so with much of Red Riding: 1974, we are kept at arms length; never able to engage with any of the players nor the grief and depression the town is experiencing. Such is amplified further by the engrained ugliness at every corner which inhibits any discernible depth; everyone has demons, everything is wrong and nobody is happy. Thus, the instances of violence are muted by the grimness by which it is surrounded.

If you are really hankering for a dark tragic crime film starring Andrew Garfield, check out Boy-A; a supremely better and more resonant film. The highlight of the film for me was seeing Sean Bean again. His presence in films is an iota of what it should be and he gives one of the films best performances. Not having yet seen the following two instalments of this series I can not say with confidence this film will not be elevated when viewed in context. At this point, what I can say with confidence is Red Riding: 1974 was not an enjoyable experience. Perhaps, then, it was a success in its own right.

Read all my reviews simonsaysmovies.blogspot.com

Reviewed by tyler-and-jack 10 / 10

Let this wolf at your door.

Wow. Just . . . . wow! This is quite possibly the finest drama I have EVER seen on British TV in years and years and years, possibly even the finest drama ever. But before I begin the review let me just say that you really need to see all 3 parts of the trilogy to get the most from the overall tapestry.

When a little girl's body turns up (with swan wings stitched into her back) in Yorkshire all eyes turn to the police force to apprehend the killer as swiftly as possible. Unofrtunately, the police seem to be too busy lining their own pockets and framing other people to find any real justice. After a life of relative inadequacy (and I know THAT feeling), a returning local lad (played by Andrew Garfield) decides to dig a little deeper but it's not long before he's in way over his head with more victims linked to the crime and more suspects that may well seem "untouchable".

Okay, it may still feel like a TV production but if it does then it's certainly one with the best production values. Cinematic in many ways that could, hopefully, make you forget that you're watching a small-screen opus.

The cast list, as is the case with the entire trilogy, is a dream one. You may not know all of the names but, trust me, these people are great actors firing on all cylinders. Peter Mullan (always great), David Morrisey (so good that he made me forget all about the travesty he was in with Sharon Stone), Sean Bean, Warren Clarke, Eddie Marsan, Rebecca Hall and Sean Harris (again, is he EVER bad??) are just some of my favourites from this outing.

The subject matter certainly doesn't make for comfortable viewing and there were times when even a lifelong horror fan such as myself began to wince and worry about what was yet to come. In many ways I feel that this actually did trip into horror territory but with a very real, unsafe horror that encroaches on our reality more often than any of us would like it to. The helplessness of child victims and the helplessness of those left in the hands of corrupt authorities/guardians ensures that you won't have an easy viewing experience. But you will have a damn worthwhile one.

See this if you like: Zodiac, The Woodsman, L.A. Confidential.

Reviewed by druid333-2 10 / 10

Phase One:The Dye Is Cast

The year is 1974. Great Britain has pretty much (all but) cast off the whole mellow,groovy hippie glow of the late 1960's (and is pretty much unaware of the punk movement that is to envelope "merrie old England" within the next couple of years),unemployment is rampant & most folk are listening to the likes of Mott The Hoople,T-Rex,David Bowie,etc. A pedophile murderer,that is being called the Yorkshire Slasher has been terrorizing the citizens of Yorkshire for the past five years,and it's up to newby journalist,Eddie Dunford to get the facts on the who,what,when,where & especially the why on why young schoolgirls are being murdered. What he gets in the interim of uncovering information is far more than what he expected:police corruption,political graft (with deep ties to organized crime),and other nastiness. 'Red Riding 1974' (or as it is better known in the United Kingdom as 'Red Riding:In The Year Of Our Lord 1974')is the first part of a three part series,which itself is a powder keg of a "who dunnit" that will keep you on the edge of your seat guessing what happens next (suggestion:hit the mens or ladies room before the film starts & avoid that jumbo soft drink,so that you won't have to miss out on anything,because you had to make a dash for the 'loo'). Julian Jarrold,who directed the superb 'Brideshead Revisited' & 'Becomming Jane',directs a very well paced thriller from a screenplay by Tony Grisoni,adapted from the celebrated novel by David Peace. Rob Hardy's,oh so fine cinematography goes for both gloss & grit, while Andrew Hulme's razor tight editing keeps the pace (and pulse)going. Andrew Gardfield plays journalist Eddie Dunford (who looks like he just stepped down from his other gig singing for Roxy Music),a young man who descends down a dark labyrinth where there is no escape. The rest of the cast is rounded out by the likes of David Morrissey, Warren Clarke,Jennifer Hennessy,Rachael Jane Allen,and others. I await the other two chapters with anticipation. Not rated by the MPAA,this film contains pervasive strong language,strong sexual content,nudity,violence,some of which is quite brutal & bloody,some rather lurid photographs that depict the Yorkshire ripper's dirty work on display,and much smoking & drinking of alcohol. Leave the little ones home for this one.

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