Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith

2005

Action / Adventure

Synopsis


Uploaded By: Bokutox
Downloaded 300,427 times
March 23, 2013 at 8:29 pm

Director

Cast

Hayden Christensen as Anakin Skywalker
Ewan McGregor as Obi-Wan Kenobi
Samuel L. Jackson as Mace Windu
1080p
1.90 GB
1920*816
English
PG-13
English
23.976 fps
2hr 20 min
P/S 198 / 896

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by mrbiscuit 9 / 10

Lucas Redeemed!

When I asked the reviewer sitting next to me to sum up Revenge of the Sith, he simply said "great!" That seemed to basically be the consensus of virtually everyone in attendance at an advance press screening of the final chapter in the Star Wars saga.

There was an exuberant mood leaving the theater, as if everyone was in collective agreement that Lucas had finally done it. That he had gone out on top, with a stunning, rock-solid coup de grace. And from all the feedback I've heard from that screening, my sense of that collective mood was right.

There are no real spoilers in ROTS. Everyone basically knows what happens in Episode 4: A New Hope. We all know Anakin becomes Vader. We know Obi Wan lives and we know Luke and Leia are born. What we don't know is how Lucas weaves those story lines into the large, six-part opus and better yet, why?

No, it's not a perfect movie. There are those moments that make us cringe. Bad dialog and High School drama class acting make for a few awkward moments where you can hear audible moans and giggles in the audience, but we have come to expect this from modern Star Wars films. The upside is that these moments are rare in Episode III.

OK, get ready. Take a deep breath. No Jar Jar! Yes, you read that right. You can let out that deep breath now.

Fortunately, we have one savior to rely on for stellar acting. Mr. Ian McDiarmid as Supreme Chancellor Palpatine. McDiarmid brings the elegance of an Alec Guiness back to the franchise in a knockout performance that leaves the audience riveted and exhausted. He is the lifeblood of the film.

As someone who saw the original 30 times in it's first month of release at the age of 13, I currently consider myself a Star Wars moderate. I don't have volumes of SW merchandise, nor can I debate whether or not carbonite contains enough oxygen to make it float. All I know is that magical feeling Star Wars gave me in the original 1977 release and that I'm happy to say, after a disappointing pair of prequels, has been finally restored and reinvigorated.

Here's to Mr. Lucas for giving us all something spectacular to remember for our entire lives that embodies the whole point of going to the movies in the first place, to escape and lose ourselves in another world.

Reviewed by cpricciardi 9 / 10

Story + Special Effects = Success!

(No Spoilers!) Excitedly submitting my comments two weeks prior to the opening of the film (after a preview screening at the Ziegfeld Theater), I am thrilled to add to what appears to be a growing wave of positive reaction to Lucas's effort in Episode III. As a life-long fan deeply caught in a love hate relationship with Episodes I and II, I cautiously awaited this final installment. I felt in my heart that this would be a great film, but feared that somehow I would again be disappointed. Maybe I was starting to succumb to the notion that I no longer had the spirit of that six year old boy who was mesmerized by the original Star Wars, long ago in 1977 at that far away NJ theater. Maybe.

From the opening 20th Century Fox logo, the movie hits the ground running, proving once again the CGI capabilities of ILM and the thrills they inspire. However, unlike the first two films, where spectacular effects were layered upon complicated, contrived and sometimes dramatically vacant scenes executed with some of the worst performances in memory, there is solid story telling here. And that's the difference.

The drama builds steadily in the first act before hitting light speed with a combination of excitement, dread, intrigue and pain. This strong dramatic spark ignites the entire cast, helping them turn in what are easily their best performances of the three films. When you have a script with this kind of thump and talented actors, the result is fun to watch. And for once, perhaps most importantly, the special effects serve the script, not the other way around.

Anakin's internal struggle, present from frame one, quickly consumes him, catapulting the film towards its inevitable conclusion. While its no surprise that the film ends on a desperate note, there does remain a glimmer of possibility as the story segues into the aptly titled classic "Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope". It's thought provoking and inspiring.

It's also worth noting that as advertised the film is dark, makes no apologies, and is much less child friendly then the others. All pluses in my opinion.

The final result with "Revenge" is a complete film that I will never forget, a somewhat renewed perspective on what Lucas was going for with Episodes I and II, and assurances that that little boy inside me is still there, popcorn in hand, ready for a good movie.

Reviewed by actorman_us 9 / 10

It's OK to be a STAR WARS fan again.

For several years now, it's been a rather uneasy proposition to be known as a STAR WARS fan. First, we had to put up with the great embarrassment of the clownish Jar Jar and the gut wrenching "acting" from the muppet known as Jake Lloyd in PHANTOM MENACE. Then came the laughably stilted dialog and the clumsily told love story from ATTACK OF THE CLONES. Fans far and wide were wondering what George Lucas had done to their beloved STAR WARS franchise! Something that once was so rollicking and without peer was being transformed into kiddie-pandering, muppet populated, CGI over-loaded dreck!

Mr. Lucas, all is forgiven. Welcome back. REVENGE OF THE SITH is the prequel installment we've been hoping for all along. Gone is the overly wooden acting and the ridiculously petrified dialog. In there place is a logical and believable storyline. Anakin's transformation is inexorably sensible. It is natural and not forced into shape by wooden dialog. Scenes between Anakin and Padme, are heartfelt and honest- a far cry from their nearly unwatchable scenes in ATTACK OF THE CLONES.

The same can be said of scenes between Anakin and Obi Wan Kenobi (Ewan McGregor is legitimately great in this film. He gives Kenobi real depth and the viewer thoroughly believes that he grows up to become Alec Guiness). There exists a real bond of deep feeling the viewer can feel between master and apprentice thus making Anakin's fate all the more tragic, as he slowly becomes more and more entangled in Palpatine's (Ian McDiarmid, in a joyfully malevolent turn) web of deception and evil.

Visuals have never been an issue in the prequel films and this is most certainly the case with REVENGE OF THE SITH. The opening sequence is a jaw-dropping collage of ships in movement, dazzling colors, and frenetic combat. Additionally, the technology used to create Yoda seems to have grown exponentially over the already impressive wizardry used to animate Yoda in CLONES. Front to back, the vistas Lucas shows us are entirely believable and staggering joys to behold.

George Lucas goes right for the jugular in this film (the PG-13 rating is well earned! Parents be advised!!). This is a very well-told story of a fall from grace told in an unflinching manner. And yet, the hope for the future is so firmly in place as this film rolls to an end, a tear will roll down your cheek if you've lived with this series of films as long as I have. STAR WARS is back. It's cool to be a fan again.

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