The Place Beyond the Pines


Crime / Drama


Uploaded By: YIFY
Downloaded 268,129 times
June 4, 2013 at 1:18 pm


Ryan Gosling as Luke
Bradley Cooper as Avery
Eva Mendes as Romina
720p 1080p
980.72 MB
23.976 fps
2hr 20 min
P/S 9 / 136
2.04 GB
23.976 fps
2hr 20 min
P/S 9 / 27

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Martin Bradley ( 10 / 10

An extraordinary movie that pulls the rug from under you

You might call Derek Cianfrance's tremendous new movie "A Place Beyond the Pines" a blue-collar epic or a tragedy in three acts; it's certainly a drama in three acts. It runs for two hours and twenty minutes and it covers a period of about 17 years and there are really only about four major characters. To talk at all about the films storyline would be to spoil what is really an extraordinary narrative where even the coincidences of the third act seem to me to have resonance of great drama and it is magnificently played by its four principal actors.

Ryan Gosling, continuing to cement his reputation as the finest young actor of his generation, is Luke, an outlaw anti-hero worthy to stand beside any played by Dean or Newman. Bradley Cooper, so much more now that the light comedian of The Hangover movies, is Avery, the idealistic young rookie cop who finds the consequences of a single act of violence leads him down paths he previously may only have dreamed of and relative newcomers Dane DeHaan and Emory Cohen are sons in desperate need of a father's love and guidance.

This is bold and innovative film-making from Cianfrance with a strong emphasis on plot development. It plays out like a great page-turner of a novel but is in fact an original screenplay. After "Blue Valentine" this marks Cianfrance out as a major big league player.

Reviewed by Chris Martin 7 / 10

Starts great but loses steam

The trailer to this film is rather misleading. It's the equivalent of advertising the whole of Disneyland with just clips of Space Mountain again and again. There's a lot more going on here than Ryan Gosling robbing banks and being a general badass in The Place Beyond The Pines. There are in fact at least three main characters all with their own story. And while the Ryan Gosling section is, a bit like Space Mountain at Disney, the best bit of the package he is only one part of a much bigger picture.

A motor bike stunt rider finds out he has a son so packs in his day job and takes the logical step of robbing banks to provide for him. The story deals with the family life of the man as well as a rookie cop who exposes his police department to be corrupt.

I found the film very absorbing from the start with Ryan Gosling's character development on fast forward so at least 3 massive life events all happen in the first 20 minutes of the film. There's not a lot of action scenes but when there are they're very tense and exciting.

The family life aspect is quite heartwarming and you do believe that his character does love his son and wants to provide for him. There are fantastic believable acting performances all round here with Ryan Gosling and later on Bradley Cooper really showcasing their acting talents. It's engaging and I really cared what happened to both of their characters.

The main problem with the film is it's length and not knowing when to stop. The first part of the film is constantly engaging and would be a nine out of ten if the film stayed like that the whole way through. When the focus shifts from characters however it really doesn't feel as exciting and almost feels like the start of totally different movie. A movie that isn't bad but is nowhere near as good as the one you've just seen.

Every story told is linked obviously but sometimes it feels a tad loose. There is a dramatic time shift when the film reaches the 100 minute mark and what follows really seems to drag. It never really felt like it was going anywhere. It was by no means boring however, it just lost a bit of steam towards the end. The Place Beyond The Pines is worth a watch but just be prepared to have you're socks blown off and then have them planted firmly back on your feet as the film continues.

Reviewed by whatalad 5 / 10

Too clich├ęd to be anything other than average

This review contains some plot details.

The Place Beyond The Pines deserves praise for its ambition to weave together three stories linked to the same event in an art house style, however the only people who will walk away from this thinking it's anything more than a nice looking cliche are those who must have seen very few films.

Director Derek Cianfrance's film suffocates under the weight of its own attempts to be an epic drama, spanning 15 years and three chapters in the lives of all involved. This is a perfect example of a film forcing itself to be something it's not; there is never enough character arc or substantial depth of character development to warrant the overbearing 150 minute running time.

As mentioned, the film is complied of three stories, the first of which is easily the most accomplished section of the film, albeit far from original. We follow Luke (Ryan Gosling), a man with a violent history who now wants to care for Romina (Eva Mendes) and their baby boy whom she has kept a secret from him and now lives with another man. He turns to robbing banks in the small town of Schenectady, New York, and gives her some of the cash he steals. So, a man with the love of a woman in his heart jumps on to the desk at a bank and points a gun... Heat, Public Enemies, The Town, Point Blank have all told a similar story over two hours allowing the audience to invest in the characters, not cramming it into 30-odd minutes.

The success of this section of the film comes not from the dialogue or set-up, but from the great performance by Ryan Gosling, channelling some of the brooding madman vibe we saw in Drive. Gosling is a very effective actor with this smaller, character-driven material and the difference between him here and in Gangster Squad couldn't be greater. Cianfrance also demonstrates both excellent and awful directorial decisions in this act; the opening tracking shot is tremendous as is a car/bike chase which shows a fantastic new way of capturing the action from inside the police car in a single take, but then Cianfrance ruins it all when the action goes hand-held and the shakycam comes out like Paul Greengrass with caffeine jitters.

The transition from story one into story two introduces Bradley Cooper as cop Avery Cross in a delightfully matter-of-fact manner, not the way you'd usually expect to see a movie star introduced; he simply appears as a cop giving chase when Luke is attempting to get away from his latest bank robbery. This was a very nice touch.

The second story, however, soon has little to do with the opening story. After events which won't get detailed here, the story goes into a police corruption scandal which is familiar to anyone who has seen a Sidney Lumet picture, Copland or even recent trash such as Pride and Glory. The film is now rapidly running out of steam as everything unfolding is a cliche of much better films (again, see Lumet's work) and the crime thriller aspect which was set-up in the opening third is now over and, essentially, a new film has begun, and we have to focus now on caring about Avery Cross. However, the corruption case is neatly resolved with no impact whatsoever on the characters or audience and then the dreaded '15 years later' title card appears.

Fifteen years on and the third story begins, and the cliche machine goes into overdrive and The Place Beyond The Pines loses any interest it may have had left. Luke's son and Avery's son become friends! They both like drugs! They have both missed father figures in their journey to adulthood! But, remember everyone, AVERY KILLED Luke, so this new friendship surely won't fall apart within 30 minutes and one of the boys won't do a Google search on their father and throw away 17 years of good upbringing bar the occasional recreational drug indulgence to take revenge on the cop who is now running for District Attorney! Oh... yes it does and yes they do. It's just screen writing by connecting the dots and is wholly disengaging and uninteresting.

This final story ultimately sums up The Place Beyond The Pines; trying making something out of nothing for there is really nothing under the surface. Crime thriller, corruption story, father and son Greek tragedy, revenge story, family drama; this film wants to be it all but ends up like a film adaptation of a 600 page novel which was never written. Shame, because it would probably make for a great novel as well.

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