Weekend

2011

Drama / Romance

21
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 95%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 86%
IMDb Rating 7.7

Synopsis


Uploaded By: Gaz
Downloaded 31,804 times
September 20, 2012 at 3:02 am

Director

Cast

Tom Cullen as Russell
Chris New as Glen
Jonathan Race as Jamie
720p
699.54 MB
1280*692
English
Not Rated
23.976 fps
1hr 37 min
P/S 3 / 25

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by c-chesley 10 / 10

This is a love story. It is not cheesy. It is not fake. It is love, plain and simple. Let go of your prejudices and bias and watch the film.

The IMDb summary of the film does it no justice whatsoever. This piece of art depicted the most genuine and sincere definition of love in any motion picture that I have seen. Besides the fact that the script was well-written, the actors carried the story to fruition in their slightest of gestures, glances, and articulations. You really fall in love with Glen and Russell and want them to be with each other. There are parts where you'll laugh, parts where you might tear up, and parts where you might wonder if you've ever felt what these characters feel for each other. There are some wonderful scenes cinematically as well. The ending is satisfying and resonant of real life, which is a nice change of pace when compared to other love stories. This is the movie that you should see, and I hope you will.

Reviewed by aupairkansas 10 / 10

This is the best low budget indie gay movie in years, and the best gay movie since BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN

I just watched WEEKEND at a screening at the Oslo LGBT film festival, and am still in shock. This is the most real cinematic version of guys falling in love in recent history. I'm a filmmaker myself, and was blown away by the caliber of the writing, directing, acting, cinematography, editing, and music of this fantastic film. There's not a false note in the movie--everything rings true, even the ending (no spoilers here.) It's the rare film, like WINTER'S BONE last year, that at every turning point takes what I call the elegant decision. WEEKEND is at a higher level than all other LGBT films playing the festival circuit this year (the only other film near this level is Tom Twyker's 3.) Actually, it's at a higher level than almost all films playing anywhere this year. Where did this film come from? Apparently the brilliant mind of Andrew Haigh (writer/director/editor), who, I noted on an IMDb search, started as an apprentice editor on GLADIATOR, and then assistant editor on BLACK HAWK DOWN (working with the master editor Pietro Scalia on both. Go UCLA!) I look forward to seeing more of Haigh's work. Do not, I repeat, DO NOT miss this movie.

Reviewed by evanston_dad 9 / 10

Movie with a Human Agenda

In "Weekend," a beautifully acted and written indie drama from writer/director (and editor) Andrew Haigh, two gay men fall heavily for each other over the course of a 2 or 3 day period, each getting at something in the other that no one before had managed to do. But this is not a "gay" movie, and people who stay away from it because they think it has a gay agenda, or that it has nothing to say to them, or who are simply uncomfortable with the sight of two men having sex, will deny themselves the pleasure of seeing a film with a universal message about what it's like to be lonely and the search for meaningful human connections that kind of loneliness motivates.

It's not that Haigh avoids addressing the complications of being gay in the present day. Part of what I admired about the film was that it put being gay, and the constant energy it takes on the part of gay men to either fight or ignore the ignorance and hostility they must constantly endure, in a context that anybody can understand. The film's central character, Russell (Tom Cullen), has been raised as a foster child in a "straight" environment. His foster brother knows he's gay and is accepting of it, but even at that, Russell's time with his brother and his brother's family only accentuates the desolate fact that the kind of "normal" happiness his brother enjoys (the solidarity of a strong marriage, children) is something that at best he will have to fight for or at worst will be denied altogether. The bitterness this harsh reality can create in gay men is illustrated in the character of Glen (Chris New), a crusader who believes happiness in marriage is a sham perpetrated by the straight community and that attempts at finding contentment and satisfaction in a life partner are akin to tilting at windmills.

Cullen and New deliver award-worthy performances, so it's a shame that this film's size and subject matter will deny it any kind of major awards attention. The film is actually breathtaking at moments, albeit in an unassuming way, in its frankness and its ability to capture perfectly in words ideas about the way our societies treat relationships, commitments and love that I had only half articulated to myself. It would be easy to believe that Haigh found two non-actors roaming the streets, asked them to star in a movie, gave them situations to play out without a script, and filmed the results. It's that authentic.

I hope people see this movie.

Grade: A

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